The Global Coronavirus Pandemic Has Revealed Cracks in the Foundation of Conventional Conservation Funding. What Should We Do Instead?

With Covid-19 upending conventional sources of conservation funding, conservationists are rethinking how to fund their work.

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Photo courtesy of Ibis Rice

Can funding for conservation be more sustainable and resilient? What would that mean, and how can it be achieved?

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In exchange for following strict environmental protocols that support forests and wildlife, farmers who sell to IBIS Rice receive 40–50% over the market rate for their rice. Photo courtesy of Ibis Rice
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At Nashulai Maasai Conservancy, the Maasai — and their cattle — live inside the reserve, alongside the wildlife. “Having an improved herd of bigger and better cattle can be a safety net away from overreliance on tourism. Fewer but better cattle help us to more sustainably balance the ways we use land,” says co-founder Nelson Ole Reiyia. Photo courtesy of Nashulai Maasai Conservancy
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Domestic cattle and wild common eland graze together around safari tents in Nashulai Maasai Conservancy, where the Maasai — and their cattle — live inside the reserve, alongside the wildlife. Photo courtesy of Nashulai Maasai Conservancy
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Ensia is a solutions-focused nonprofit media outlet reporting on our changing planet.

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