Should plants and animals that relocate because of climate change be considered invasive?

Some researchers are calling for a more nuanced approach when it comes to flora and fauna that adjust their range to accommodate a warming world.

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Photo © iStockphoto.com | neil bowman (warbler) | PNP Images (salmon) |
Coral photo courtesy of Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary.
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Known and anticipated changes in species distribution due to climate change around the world have implications for culture, society ecosystems, governance and climate change. Figure used with permission from Gretta T. Pecl, originally published on 31 Mar 2017 in Science 355(6332).
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In recent years, northern flying squirrels in Canada have found themselves in the company of new neighbors — southern flying squirrels expanding their range as the climate warms. Public Domain | USFW
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The marbled salamander, a native of the eastern U.S., is among species whose range could expand northward to accommodate rising temperatures. Photo courtesy of Seánín Óg from Flickr, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

At the heart of these questions are values.

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