Look out, food deserts: Here come the food forests

As cities build up green spaces, developers are increasingly factoring in fruit and nut trees, berry bushes and more as a way to boost nutrition while enhancing aesthetics

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Urban food forest at Browns Mill courtesy of AGLanta.org

“The kinds of partnerships food forests foster are exactly that, resilient partnerships for long-term commitments to a community.” — Rich Dolesh

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The seven layers of a complete food forest range from canopy fruit and nut trees to ground-level foods such as strawberries and roots. Image courtesy of Graham Burnett from Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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At 7 acres (3 hectares), the Beacon Food Forest in Seattle is one of the larest in the U.S. Photo courtesy of © Jonathan H. Lee via theBeacon Food Forest
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Ripe plums mark the site of the Fair-Amount Food Forest, a community-based initiative that aims to expand access to fresh fruits and other edibles for Philadelphia residents. Photo courtesy of Michael Muehlbauer/Fair-Amount Food Forest
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Although permaculture in many ways is self-sustaining, ongoing care is necessary, especially in urban settings.

“The education on how to utilize and benefit from different plants, how they grow and the environment… needs to be part of the picture for actual change.” — Michael Muehlbauer

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