As tensions rise along the U.S.–Mexico border, cross-border ecosystems suffer

Safety concerns, decreased funding and tightened border policies are inhibiting efforts to understand and protect biodiversity in fragile ecosystems that don’t know or care what country they’re in

Photos © iStockphoto.com/LindaJohnsonbaugh
The beginning of the border wall marks the edge of the U.S. boundary of the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve. Photo by Molly McCluskey
A sign warns visitors to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. It’s one of several similar signs in parks along the U.S.–Mexico border. Photo by Molly McCluskey
A Border Patrol agent rides an ATV through Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve. Photo by Molly McCluskey
Forty miles of the San Pedro River run through the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area, creating an ecosystem that dozens of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles call home, as well as an important resource for migrating birds. Photo courtesy of BLM from Flickr, licensed under CC BY 2.0
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