As climate change makes growing seasons less predictable, scientists dig into a novel approach to boosting crop resilience

Epigenetic modification of plants shows promise for enhancing food security — but we still have a lot to learn

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Photo courtesy of Sally Mackenzie
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In greenhouse and field experiments, tomato plants with certain epigenetic modifications produce more fruit than unmodified plants in a given amount of time. Photo courtesy of Sally Mackenzie
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Nathan Springer studies the epigenetic regulation of traits in maize, an important food crop around the world. Photo courtesy of Nathan Springer
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Cassava, a staple in many tropical countries, is among the crops in which epigenetic modification shows promise for improving yields. Photo © iStockphoto.com | pailoolom
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